“WORST OUTLAW IN THE WEST”

WORST OUTLAW IN WEST

—  A WANNABE BAD MAN —   On a warm late summer night in 1897, three members of the Jennings Gang boarded a southbound Santa Fe locomotive and ordered the engineer to bring the passenger train to a stop.

After lumbering to a halt a few miles outside Edmund in Oklahoma Territory, other gang members came out of hiding and charged the express car to rob the Wells Fargo safe.

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“SHOOT FIRST, ASK QUESTIONS LATER”

DANGEROUS DAN

— DANGEROUS DAN TUCKER — Lawman Dan Tucker, gripping a double-barrelled shotgun and wearing a Colt on his hip, patrolled the main street of Deming, New Mexico, hat pulled low, eyes scanning right and left.  

Tucker, the city marshal of Shakespeare, New Mexico, about sixty miles to the west, traveled to Deming in November 1881, to help deal with a rebellious outlaw gang that had gained an upper hand in the small […]

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“ALONE AND OUTNUMBERED”

Sheriff Morse, Alameda County

— DESERT SHOWDOWN — In the soft glow of twilight, Alameda County Sheriff Harry N. Morse guided a small posse into the Sausalito Valley in the Panoche Mountains in January 1871, tracking a band of outlaws headed by Juan Soto, one of the region’s most feared gunmen. 

Morse had conducted a relentless manhunt, determined to capture the brutal Soto, wanted for robbery and murder.

“ALONE AND OUTNUMBERED”

“AUTHOR GEORGE C. SIMS”

Paul Cain & Peter Ruric

  Author George C. Sims used a couple of different pen names to write hard-boiled detective mysteries, but the greatest mystery may have been the author himself, who often found inspiration in a bottle.

Few facts exist about Sims’ life. Born in either 1902 or 1906, he grew up in Des Moines, Iowa. His father, William Dow Sims, once served as a police detective and owned a drugstore.

After his parents […]

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