“GOOD DAY TO DIE”

CRAWFORD GOLDSBY

— BLOOD-THIRSTY MAD DOG — The young prisoner emerged from the courthouse at Fort Smith, Arkansas, under heavy guard for his walk to the gallows. He stopped for a second, looked up at the sky, and squinted into the sunlight. “It is a good day to die…” he whispered.

Crawford Goldsby, born at Fort Concho, Texas, February 8, 1876, began his criminal career early in life—age 13. In addition to […]

Continue reading “GOOD DAY TO DIE”

“FEARLESS AND EFFICIENT”

Deputy U.S. Marshal

— ONE OF A KIND —  Deputy U.S. Marshal F.M. Miller adjusted the Colt revolver and full cartridge belt, shot a quick glance at a wagon full of prisoners, and then mounted up. Miller happened to be the only female deputy working in the Indian Territory in the late 19th century. 

The Nov. 19, 1891, issue of the Muskogee Phoenix reported Miller won the appointment from the federal court at Paris, Texas, and most of […]

Continue reading “FEARLESS AND EFFICIENT”

“CLASSROOM TO COURTROOM”

"LITTLE BILL" RAIDLER

— HE RODE WITH THE DOOLIN GANG — The man standing inside the mouth of a cave near Bartlesville, Oklahoma Territory, took aim at three lawmen heading his way and snapped off several shots at them.

Before the outlaw could take aim again, U.S. Deputy Marshal Bill Tilghman, who tracked “Little Bill” Raidler to his hideout, returned fire, shattering Raidler’s hand.

When Little Bill […]

Continue reading “CLASSROOM TO COURTROOM”

“GUNS OF JUSTICE”

U.S. Marshal

— ONLY GOOD OUTLAW IS A DEAD ONE — U.S. Marshal Evett Dumas Nix could tell from Judge Frank Dale’s somber expression, the chief justice of the Oklahoma Territory Supreme Court had something important on his mind.

Dale, square-jawed and thin-lipped, motioned the lawman to a chair in front of the desk. It was no secret the judge harbored frustration and anger over the death of lawmen in […]

Continue reading “GUNS OF JUSTICE”

Page 1 of 212